About

Patricia Handshiegel

Digital Dish covers the ins and outs of an Internet executive moving into the television arena. Disher Patricia Handschiegel is the founder of Stylediary.net, which she sold to Stylehive.com in November 2007. She has a background in Internet infrastructure and technology business, was an advisor to Kaboodle.com (sold to Hearst in 2007), and has contributed as an entertainment/media business writer for Venturebeat.com. She’s also been an early visionary of professional Internet TV content since 2005 and is currently an advisor on several entertainment/Internet projects. Always an entrepreneur, she had a highly profitable babysitting monopoly at 11, lent her writing skill to students at 17 and landed her first published national article at 23.

She has also worked as a ghost writer for a national TV correspondent. At 22, she was recognized nationally for promoting the growth of women’s hockey and advised companies on creating hockey products for women. She’s been quoted and profiled in dozens of media outlets since and is currently developing two book concepts. A serial entrepreneur, she plans to continue to build Internet, entertainment and media companies, with the goal of promoting social change and charities. She is currently involved in the use of technology to help find missing and abused children, and has contributed financially to TheJoyfulChild.org and other organizations. She is the founder of Look|Shop|List.com (in development).

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Update on Projects as Emmy Excitement Builds

September 18, 2008 2:09 PM

It’s exciting to be in the television/entertainment business going into Emmy weekend. I was just a fashion writer before, so going into it now as an industry exec is an entirely new experience.

It comes at a time where I’m also in the process of shopping a few projects. One, as I’ve mentioned, is a broadcast show with an interactive/Internet tie baked in. The others are Web show concepts I’m working to bundle into palatable bites that networks, audiences and brands can attach to.

Things are progressing along with my broadcast project. It’s exciting! My Web concepts are still a little early—but just as thrilling.

The Web projects are easier to make production-wise, but there’s a trick to monetizing. I’ve been working on a formula and am aggressively putting the pieces in place to make it possible.

Some of the important elements of creating and selling Web shows aren’t fully developed just yet.

I like the work, but I still find it incredibly complicated at times.

Putting together, shopping and ultimately selling a television show is an enormous project. There are so many people involved, so many elements to bring together, maintain and manage. Right now, we are taking some specific, strategic steps to bring the best possible package to a network. It’s been a ton of calls and callbacks, discussions, etc.

It’s all really exciting, but I’m anxious to be three months from now, when I’ll know the outcome!

I think networks will be excited with what we have to offer and, more importantly, the audience will love it. The idea came after a few years of seeing conversations online about various celebrities, shows and characters. I’m convinced there are specific differences between what the public will look at and what it will attach to. Everybody watches celebrities, or takes a look. But what they become truly engaged and passionate about seems to require a little more than catching their attention.

I built the project based on what I believe drives engagement among viewers. I’m eager to see if I’m right about it! More on this soon.

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