About

Patricia Handshiegel

Digital Dish covers the ins and outs of an Internet executive moving into the television arena. Disher Patricia Handschiegel is the founder of Stylediary.net, which she sold to Stylehive.com in November 2007. She has a background in Internet infrastructure and technology business, was an advisor to Kaboodle.com (sold to Hearst in 2007), and has contributed as an entertainment/media business writer for Venturebeat.com. She’s also been an early visionary of professional Internet TV content since 2005 and is currently an advisor on several entertainment/Internet projects. Always an entrepreneur, she had a highly profitable babysitting monopoly at 11, lent her writing skill to students at 17 and landed her first published national article at 23.

She has also worked as a ghost writer for a national TV correspondent. At 22, she was recognized nationally for promoting the growth of women’s hockey and advised companies on creating hockey products for women. She’s been quoted and profiled in dozens of media outlets since and is currently developing two book concepts. A serial entrepreneur, she plans to continue to build Internet, entertainment and media companies, with the goal of promoting social change and charities. She is currently involved in the use of technology to help find missing and abused children, and has contributed financially to TheJoyfulChild.org and other organizations. She is the founder of Look|Shop|List.com (in development).

Categories

Digital Dish



What I Want to Create Now

September 15, 2008 5:52 PM

It has been a tough day for me with projects, hence the lateness of today’s post.

What starts out as something that feels so full of promise is always subjected to those times when it seems like nothing’s going on. People are deciding, thinking, doing their thing. Hello, haven’t they figured out that business doesn’t wait for anyone?!

I jest, but still. There are days when you feel like Tom Cruise in "Top Gun" and everybody loves you, and days when you are Tom Cruise on Oprah’s couch and everybody just shrugs.
You can guess which of these I’ve been feeling like today.

It’s just business—and it holds true in any business. But I can’t lie. It doesn’t make it any easier, no matter what kind of project or market. I waited nearly two long years for the end result of my Internet startup, and I’m sure the same will go for any project in any market, now and forever.

The ticket, of course, is to keep moving and keep focused. Right now, I’m developing three or four new ideas for the Web, which I will be working to bundle with revenue and sell to a buyer.

Here’s a sneak peek at what they are:

Teen reality series: I know most of the market is all over comedy, webisodes and docu-reality series targeting the 18-25 demographic, but I’m convinced there’s opportunity in the younger part of the market. I’m currently creating a couple of ideas that will not just tap that demographic, but hopefully inspire girls.

News/talk shows: I believe this format for Web TV has a greater adoptability rate than webisode series, and I’m dying to see if I’m right. Two of my new concepts fall into this space and are going to be super fun. Hint: I’m really excited about things like travel and parenting.

Concepts that inspire UGC: Nobody talks about user-generated content the way they used to, but I still think there are a lot of consumers who would attach to the idea of creating short video projects of their own. One of my Web show ideas leaves plenty of room for just that. It’s professionally produced, but is a concept designed to inspire the audience to create as well.

Will these ideas work? We will soon find out!

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.tvweek.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-tb.cgi/12958

Comments (3)

Exciting stuff.

You're on the right track...as you already know it's all about marrying the right content to the right, highly targeted audiences.

Parenting is great (especially new Moms) who require information and ease of access. Niche travel whether adventure oriented or upscale luxury is good too. Harder, perhaps given the economy.
Local travel?

Look at the incredible success of Machinima. Our ad agency has a video game client there...and the click through rates have been remarkable.

Mario:

Patricia, I was wondering if your shows projects are targeted towards a market niche as are the other two. Somehow by your biography I think you always work over audience niches. would you care to share the why of it?

@mario, do you mean that i focus on niches? i'm not clear but happy to answer if you can elaborate a little.

@scott, thanks!

Post a comment