About

Patricia Handshiegel

Digital Dish covers the ins and outs of an Internet executive moving into the television arena. Disher Patricia Handschiegel is the founder of Stylediary.net, which she sold to Stylehive.com in November 2007. She has a background in Internet infrastructure and technology business, was an advisor to Kaboodle.com (sold to Hearst in 2007), and has contributed as an entertainment/media business writer for Venturebeat.com. She’s also been an early visionary of professional Internet TV content since 2005 and is currently an advisor on several entertainment/Internet projects. Always an entrepreneur, she had a highly profitable babysitting monopoly at 11, lent her writing skill to students at 17 and landed her first published national article at 23.

She has also worked as a ghost writer for a national TV correspondent. At 22, she was recognized nationally for promoting the growth of women’s hockey and advised companies on creating hockey products for women. She’s been quoted and profiled in dozens of media outlets since and is currently developing two book concepts. A serial entrepreneur, she plans to continue to build Internet, entertainment and media companies, with the goal of promoting social change and charities. She is currently involved in the use of technology to help find missing and abused children, and has contributed financially to TheJoyfulChild.org and other organizations. She is the founder of Look|Shop|List.com (in development).

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Web Show: Moving Right Along

October 1, 2008 11:01 AM

On Monday I told you I was starting to develop a Web TV project. I’ve been experimenting with producing ideas for several years now as a side effort, like the fashion news show (pictured) that I wrote for someone else a year or two ago.

Fashion News Weekly

My first Web TV idea was tied to my then-social media company, StyleDiary.net. It’s something I’m considering producing now (minus StyleDiary, which I sold last year), along with a few other ideas utilizing different show formats and concepts.

All play on what I think can succeed within the market and with the audience. What ends up being chosen will depend on what makes the most sense. I’m looking forward to the process of finding out what that is.

To prepare, I spent the past few months exploring and establishing Web TV industry and distribution relationships. This week has been all about taking things to the next step, talking with prospective partners, etc.

I mentioned having a goal to build the show with revenue baked in. It’ll be interesting to see if we can make it happen.

What I’m most excited about are some of the new distribution opportunities in the market.

What’s nice about Web TV is that the options are open. Starting a show doesn’t require the same (or as many) hoops that a broadcast project does. You can literally create just about anything at the moment.

If I owned a broadcast TV network, I’d launch or buy a little startup incubator/lab to experiment with Web show ideas. Maybe the production/development budget could come out of marketing until online ad revenue expands to offset costs.

Regardless, creating the project has already been very engaging. We’ll see how things progress this week.

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