About

Patricia Handshiegel

Digital Dish covers the ins and outs of an Internet executive moving into the television arena. Disher Patricia Handschiegel is the founder of Stylediary.net, which she sold to Stylehive.com in November 2007. She has a background in Internet infrastructure and technology business, was an advisor to Kaboodle.com (sold to Hearst in 2007), and has contributed as an entertainment/media business writer for Venturebeat.com. She’s also been an early visionary of professional Internet TV content since 2005 and is currently an advisor on several entertainment/Internet projects. Always an entrepreneur, she had a highly profitable babysitting monopoly at 11, lent her writing skill to students at 17 and landed her first published national article at 23.

She has also worked as a ghost writer for a national TV correspondent. At 22, she was recognized nationally for promoting the growth of women’s hockey and advised companies on creating hockey products for women. She’s been quoted and profiled in dozens of media outlets since and is currently developing two book concepts. A serial entrepreneur, she plans to continue to build Internet, entertainment and media companies, with the goal of promoting social change and charities. She is currently involved in the use of technology to help find missing and abused children, and has contributed financially to TheJoyfulChild.org and other organizations. She is the founder of Look|Shop|List.com (in development).

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Young Hollywood Is So Last Season

January 26, 2009 10:01 AM

If there’s one thing I’ve realized these past seven months of being in the entertainment business, it’s how different the perception and the reality are in terms of what the world sees and what is in the business. This was made crystal clear to me when I attended the Golden Globe Awards and Producers Guild Awards this past month.

For the first time, I honestly “get” the business.

I snapped this with my own digital camera at the PGAs this weekend while on the red carpet.

In some ways, it’s the first time I’ve felt really, really excited about it. I love doing work in the entertainment market and know so many amazing people. They’re putting the shows on your TV set, “making” the stars everybody loves and brokering deals the Silicon Valley/tech crowd could never imagine. I’ve also met some incredible actors and actresses.

But, there’s a whole other side to the industry, one that’s kind of a bit nonsensical.

As a business person, this has made it harder to do the work I came here to do and has at times been frustrating. It’s like having to sift through an enormous, endless pile of bad shoes for months on end to find the few Prada and Christian Louboutin tucked away somewhere.

Who people think runs this town and who actually runs it are very different. It was so blatantly obvious to me at the Golden Globes a few weeks ago that I’m still in awe of it. This weekend, I attended the Producers Guild Awards and I’m even surer than ever.

I now actually like that there are these two parts to the equation in the market. It’s a distraction for my competitors.

What was really interesting to me as well was how different some of the younger actors/actresses were compared to the seasoned talent. At the PGAs, the women appeared a little cockier, posed a lot more and lingered longer on the red carpet. I’m not sure if any of them knew that most of the reporters kept saying, “Who is that?” It must be incredible to be a rising young star, but it did look a little weird.

Then somebody like Catherine Zeta-Jones, Dana Delaney or Frances Fisher comes along and it’s very different. They’re cool, chilled out and professional, like they’re there on business.

Over the course of this weekend, I realized this is the Hollywood that made Hollywood glamorous. And, in a lot of ways, how really kind of tired the “young Hollywood” vibe is. I don’t think it has anything to do with age or experience—it’s attitude.

I can’t lie. I think that focus on young Hollywood cheapened the industry’s brand.

I’m not sure if it’s Michelle Obama or if the economy has just made the Paris Hilton form suddenly look a little silly, but real Hollywood seems to be coming back.

I think it’s going to make the younger talent step up to the level of the industry elite versus the other way around, and the business will benefit. It probably won’t mean that we’ll see any less of the usual suspects, but at least they may represent a little better. I think it’ll be a good change for everyone (including them).

I for one can’t deny that I like the bar being raised in our country again. Cool, smart and classy is the kind of image America should have.

One thing I can say is I’ve never been speechless any time I’ve crossed the path of anyone like Lindsay Lohan or Nicky Hilton, who I’ve seen often. Yet I couldn’t even utter a word in the presence of Ron Howard and Michael Douglas. It was pretty hilarious.

That’s the Hollywood Hollywood should want to be. I’m glad to see it coming back.

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Comments (3)

lynnfsawyer@hotmail.com:

Like?

ugh - the over-use of like, Quote: I now actually like that there are these two parts to the equation in the market. It’s a distraction for my competitors.

no credibility - give up now little journalist.

lynn:

Quote/Again: Stop the "Like"...

i.e. "Then somebody like Catherine Zeta-Jones, Dana Delaney or Frances Fisher comes along and it’s very different. They’re cool, chilled out and professional, like they’re there on business."

Get a clue pretend journalist, you should minimize your predict "like"... Gosh!


@lynn, Thank you for your comments. So you're familiar, I'm an entrepreneur that chronicles my experiences in the market via this blog, so it's intended just to be my general thoughts, opinion, etc. I'm not a journalist.

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