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History Channel’s Soldier-Generated Content

November 12, 2007 12:25 PM

In honor of Veterans Day, take a sobering look at www.History.com and click on “Band of Bloggers: War Through a Soldier’s Eyes.” The content that went up online Friday coincided with the History Channel’s one-hour televised program that night.

The content is uncensored and gripping. A History Channel spokesman said the online content is a mix of videos and text blogs from soldier-generated content that is aggregated from other Web sites.

In addition, “Band of Bloggers” is reaching out to ask soldiers to share their own videos and their war experiences. You’ll be surprised at the candor here, and how they think this war is going. A lot of the young men and women say they had no idea what they were getting into and discuss how poorly prepared some of them were.

So forward this to your congressman if he told you the war would last only one year.

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Comments (7)

Kathy:

This site says it all -- and shows it all -- like it is in Iraq. With the video that's up now, there is no romance to war. It's sad and ugly. And when you start to think you're watching a movie, you realize that at any moment a bullet could come over the wall and hit the camera. I commend the History Channel for showing the reality over there.

Marianne Paskowski:

Kathy,

The text portion of the soldier generated news is just as revealing. Check it out again.

Thanks for the post,

Marianne

Marianne:

I only wish the mainstream media were as bold with their reporting. U.S. news coverage of this war is too sterile, scrubbed down and censored. I have to watch the BBC or read foreign newspapers to get a full view.

We need more of this type of reporting in the United States - and now.

As a veteran of the first Gulf War, I get so tired of hearing civilians and keyboard commandos talk about why "we" are over there fighting.

We who? A 20-something blogger at National Review and a 40-something columnist at the Washington Times do not constitute "we." Said blogger is cashing his National Review paycheck for cheerleading foreign interventionism while someone elses does the bleeding and dying. This is a very serious matter and deserves serious coverage.

Marianne Paskowski:

Hi James,

Couldn't agree more with you. It's amazing when you go to Europe and watch TV how different it is. Even the liberal cable nets here don't tell the whole story. Nor do the conservative ones. I think they're just in a ratings war with one another, taking advantage of a country that is polarized over political views.

And for whatever reasons, The History Channel didn't promote this to the extent it could have. I missed the Friday night telecast and only heard about the site when a friend told me about it.And that's too bad, the channel did a great job here.

Thanks for your post,
Marianne

Observer:

The layoffs are unfortunate, but must not have been unexpected at this point. Smart people there. Wish them well and hope they land softly.

The name doesn't make sense at first blush, but Turner has savvy marketers, so interested to see what they do with it. Keeping it in the "t" tradition has worked just fine for TNT and TBS. A killer tagline, great creative, lots of cross promotion and a deep pocket marketing budget can do wonders.

The loss of court coverage is unfortunte. Not only for the core trial junkies, but it's also bound to treaten the nets cable carriage. Another me-too crime and cops gone wild net isn't what operators bargained for when they launched. Trial coverage is what made it important and distinctive. Sure to be fireworks at deal renewal time, if not sooner.

Observer:

The layoffs are unfortunate, but must not have been unexpected at this point. Smart people there. Wish them well and hope they land softly.

The name doesn't make sense at first blush, but Turner has savvy marketers, so interested to see what they do with it. Keeping it in the "t" tradition has worked just fine for TNT and TBS. A killer tagline, great creative, lots of cross promotion and a deep pocket marketing budget can do wonders.

The loss of court coverage is unfortunte. Not only for the core trial junkies, but it's also bound to treaten the nets cable carriage. Another me-too crime and cops gone wild net isn't what operators bargained for when they launched. Trial coverage is what made it important and distinctive. Sure to be fireworks at deal renewal time, if not sooner.

Observer:

The layoffs are unfortunate, but must not have been unexpected at this point. Smart people there. Wish them well and hope they land softly.

The name doesn't make sense at first blush, but Turner has savvy marketers, so interested to see what they do with it. Keeping it in the "t" tradition has worked just fine for TNT and TBS. A killer tagline, great creative, lots of cross promotion and a deep pocket marketing budget can do wonders.

The loss of court coverage is unfortunte. Not only for the core trial junkies, but it's also bound to treaten the nets cable carriage. Another me-too crime and cops gone wild net isn't what operators bargained for when they launched. Trial coverage is what made it important and distinctive. Sure to be fireworks at deal renewal time, if not sooner.

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