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TelevisionWeek contributing writer Daisy Whitney is blogging about the pinnacles and pitfalls facing viewers who want to consume television in new ways. Check in frequently as Daisy kicks the tires on the new media juggernaut and dishes on which services do -- and don’t -- make the cut.

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Trial and Error



Stop! There Are Too Many Web 2.0 Companies!

July 17, 2007 9:29 AM

Today I have officially decided there are too many new startups. There are too many we-do-online-video-with-social-networking-but-it’s-premium-content-and-not-what-your-younger-brother-shoots-in-the-garage companies.

You may be wondering how I got to this point. Well, I’ll tell you.

It happened this morning when I received two emails—one from Mesmo.TV and one from For Your Imagination. Mesmo.TV lets you “discover, collect, watch and share shows” and videos with friends, while For Your Imagination produces Web shows.

OK, let me just say that I could be totally wrong. I could be eating crow in a month or a year when these companies are the two hottest gets on the Web. But right now, my head is stuffed full of what feels like hundreds of companies already that do this stuff.

I can’t tell them apart anymore. Can you?


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Comments (3)

Gina:

The space being crowded only validates it. And while not all the companies will survive the burst, many will profit. For the web show production companies, it will all depend on how successful each show is. Because MySpace and Facebook are already established, I am less optimistic about the emerging social networking sites.

jim:

actually i think the video companies coming out now like for your imagination, vuguru, nextnewnetworks and 60frames are pursuing the right model. i may be wrong but companies that produce the content that can then use all the available media social networks to market their shows are in the drivers seats!

Bryan:

I never could tell them apart, and have no idea how they're going to get audiences to make any money. Production may be cheaper than broadcast TV, but you still need ad money to survive and visitors to see ads.

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