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TelevisionWeek contributing writer Daisy Whitney is blogging about the pinnacles and pitfalls facing viewers who want to consume television in new ways. Check in frequently as Daisy kicks the tires on the new media juggernaut and dishes on which services do -- and don’t -- make the cut.

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Trial and Error



Monogamy with Network Web Sites, Playing The Field with User-Gen

February 15, 2008 10:19 AM

As you head off into the long weekend to ski or ponder the meaning of the presidency or just to curl up with a bowl of popcorn and an iPod three nights in a row, here are some online video numbers to chew on.

Nielsen Online is now measuring actual video streams across the Internet with its VideoCensus product and found that viewers are often exclusive when it comes to network Web sites, but they like to play the field with their user-generated sites.

Take a look at this chart, which shows the percent of viewer overlap with network Web sites. For example, only 24% of viewers at NBC.com also viewed content on ABC.com.

Network TV Site ABC.com NBC.com CBS Television FOX Broadcasting
ABC.com NA 16% 5% 4%
NBC.com 24% NA 7% 8%
CBS Television 21% 17% NA 10%
FOX Broadcasting 18% 20% 10% NA

But now look at the cross-over viewership of popular user-generated sites with YouTube.

CGM Web Site Viewer Overlap with YouTube
MySpace.com 84%
Veoh 93%
Break.com 87%

Nielsen also found that 116.7 million unique viewers, or 73 percent of active Web users, watched about 6.2 billion video streams in December 2007.

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Comments (1)

Sure, but the brand promiscuity is intentional on the part of the user generation content folks. Much in the way that Google rode up on the back of Yahoo, YouTube rode up on the back of MySpace -- remember the user outcry when MySpace banned the use of YouTube videos on their site? Every "Break.com" video has a "post to YouTube" button and the same on YouTube and MySpace. Cross-posting is a form of marketing (disguised as free hosting) pioneered by Flickr, and copied widely by properties all over the web.

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