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64th Primetime Emmy Awards: 'Mad Men' Winning Streak Comes to an End; Here's the List of Winners THR, EW

After winning the Emmy for outstanding drama series four years in a row, AMC’s “Mad Men” ran into a juggernaut at Sunday’s 64th Primetime Emmy Awards, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Showtime’s "Homeland" broke "Mad Men’s" winning streak, taking not only outstanding drama series but also outstanding lead actress in a drama, Claire Danes, and outstanding lead actor, Damian Lewis.

On the comedy side, ABC’s “Modern Family” won the Emmy for outstanding comedy series for the third time in a row, while the show’s Julie Bowen and Eric Stonestreet were honored with trophies for their supporting roles.

The awards presentation was "largely predictable yet again," writes James Hibberd in EW.com's Inside TV.

"Still, there were several wins in key categories that prompted gasps in the backstage press room and proved prognosticators don’t always get it right," he notes.

Among those surprises: Giancarlo Esposito didn't win for best supporting actor in a drama for “Breaking Bad.” Instead, Aaron Paul of the same show took home the award. Esposito's performance as Gus Fring had many predicting he would win, Hibberd notes.

Lewis' win for "Homeland" was also a surprise, with Bryan Cranston of "Breaking Bad" favored to win and some hoping Jon Hamm of "Mad Men" would capture the award.

Jon Cryer's trophy for best comedy actor was another unpredicted win. Cryer had previously won an Emmy for his "Two and a Half Men" role in 2009, but that was in the supporting category. "Critics were pulling for 'Louie's’ Louis C.K., while others thought '30 Rock's’ Alec Baldwin might stage a comeback," Hibberd notes.

In the best actor in a movie or miniseries role, Kevin Costner won for his work in "Hatfields & McCoys." Costner’s win had some fans of Benedict Cumberbatch in "Sherlock" upset, Hibberd notes.

Here’s a list of the winners:

Outstanding drama series: "Homeland"

Outstanding comedy series: "Modern Family"

Outstanding miniseries or movie: "Game Change"

Outstanding lead actress in a drama series: Claire Danes, "Homeland"

Outstanding lead actor in a drama series: Damian Lewis, "Homeland"

Outstanding supporting actress in a drama series: Maggie Smith, "Downton Abbey"

Outstanding supporting actor in a drama series: Aaron Paul, "Breaking Bad"

Outstanding directing for a drama series: Tim Van Patten, "Boardwalk Empire"

Outstanding writing for a drama series: Alex Gansa, Howard Gordon, Gideon Raff, "Homeland"

Outstanding lead actress in a comedy series: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, "Veep"

Outstanding lead actor in a comedy series: Jon Cryer, "Two and a Half Men"

Outstanding supporting actress in a comedy series: Julie Bowen, "Modern Family"

Outstanding supporting actor in a comedy series: Eric Stonestreet, "Modern Family"

Outstanding directing in a comedy series: Steve Levitan, "Modern Family"

Outstanding writing for a comedy series: Louis C.K., "Louie"

Outstanding lead actor in a miniseries or movie: Kevin Costner, "Hatfields & McCoys"

Outstanding lead actress in a miniseries or movie: Julianne Moore, "Game Change"

Outstanding supporting actor in a miniseries or movie: Tom Berenger, "Hatfields & McCoys"

Outstanding supporting actress in a miniseries or movie: Jessica Lange, "American Horror Story"

Outstanding directing for a miniseries or movie: Jay Roach, "Game Change"

Outstanding writing for a miniseries or movie: Danny Strong, "Game Change"

Outstanding variety series: "The Daily Show" with Jon Stewart

Outstanding directing for a variety special: Glenn Weiss, "65th Annual Tony Awards"

Outstanding writing for a variety special: Louis C.K., "Louie C.K. Live at the Beacon Theatre"

Outstanding host for a reality show: Tom Bergeron, "Dancing with the Stars"

Outstanding reality-competition program: "The Amazing Race"