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House of Heroin: Report Says Philip Seymour Hoffman Had 70 Bags of Heroin, Prescription Drugs in Apartment New York Daily News, Cameron Crowe's website

"Sources say 70 baggies of heroin, at least 50 of which were unopened, were found in [Philip Seymour Hoffman's] apartment — and were imprinted with ‘Ace of Spades' or stamped with an Ace of Hearts, indicating drugs manufactured with a powerful pain reliever called fentanyl," reports the New York Daily News.

The article also says, "In Hoffman’s apartment, one of the five prescription drugs police found was buprenorphine, which heroin addicts take to help kick a habit, sources said."

"Meanwhile, celebrity friends and supporters stopped by the Jane Street apartment a few blocks away where Hoffman had lived with girlfriend Mimi O’Donnell and their three children until his drug relapse," the report adds, saying that "Cate Blanchett, who Hoffman worked with on the 1999 movie 'The Talented Mr. Ripley,' came bearing gifts for the three kids — and she had tears in her eyes."

Speaking about Hoffman's considerable talents, director Cameron Crowe, in his blog, wrote the following about Hoffman. Crowe is talking about his movie "Almost Famous," wherein Hoffman played music critic Lester Bangs. In the scene, Hoffman is talking on the phone to actor Patrick Fugit, who plays an aspiring rock music journalist like Crowe was when he was younger.

" 'My original take on this scene was a loud, late night pronouncement from Lester Bangs.' Crowe writes. 'A call to arms. In Phil’s hands it became something different. A scene about quiet truths shared between two guys, both at the crossroads, both hurting, and both up too late. It became the soul of the movie. In between takes, Hoffman spoke to no one. He listened only to his headset, only to the words of Lester himself. (His Walkman was filled with rare Lester interviews.) When the scene was over, I realized that Hoffman had pulled off a magic trick. He’d leapt over the words and the script, and gone hunting for the soul and compassion of the private Lester, the one only a few of us had ever met. Suddenly the portrait was complete. The crew and I will always be grateful for that front row seat to his genius.' "

Here's the scene: