In Depth

WGA Strike Roundup: Thursday, Feb. 7

Academy President ‘Nervous’ About Oscars
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences President Sid Ganis said the Writers Guild of America strike is making him “nervous” about the Academy Awards, according to Daily Variety. Awards producers who need to make worldwide travel arrangements for nominees and potential presenters for the Feb. 24 event are running out of time, the newspaper says, citing Ganis.

WGA Set for Mass Picketing at Disney Studios Today
Walt Disney Studios today will be the site of what many in the industry believe to be the final mass picketing by striking Writers Guild of America members, Web site DeadlineHollywoodDaily.com reports.

Storylines Will Be Altered by WGA Strike
“Ugly Betty” and “Heroes” are among the television shows whose post-Writers Guild of America strike storylines would be either substantially altered or delayed altogether because of a shortened season, Entertainment Weekly reports. “Ugly Betty” will need to complete a 23-episode story arc in 17 episodes, according to executive producer Silvio Horta. New episodes of “Heroes” may be delayed until fall because the three new episodes the show may finish won’t allow for a new story arc, called “Villains,” to be completed, the magazine says.

SAG Members Concerned About WGA Strike
Some members of the Screen Actors Guild, whose contract with studios expires June 30, are concerned that the Writers Guild of America strike may weaken SAG’s position in upcoming talks, Daily Variety reports. Television actors, out of work since the WGA strike started three months ago, may be more willing to agree to studio terms in order to prevent another work stoppage, the newspaper says.

Studios, Spec Script Writers, Starting to Talk
Studio development executives and script writers’ agents are beginning informal discussions about potential spec scripts in preparation for the end of the Writers Guild of America strike, Hollywood Reporter says, citing executives it didn’t identify. Some studios want new scripts in the pipeline to make up for the three-plus months of lost time from the strike, the newspaper reports.

—Danny King