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2002-03 pilot pickups

May 6, 2002  •  Post A Comment

ABC
comedies
“A Few Simple Rules” (Touchstone Television)–John Ritter (“Three’s Company”) stars as a protective dad who deals with his teenage daughters; based on W. Bruce Cameron’s book “8 Simple Rules for Dating my Teenage Daughter.” Tracy Gamble is writer and executive producer; Tom Shadyac and Flody Suarez are executive producers; Gil Junger is director.
“Essex Prep” (Touchstone Television, Brad Grey Television)–A comedy about an all-male boarding school. Paul Simms is writer and executive producer; James Burrows is director.
“The Funkhousers” (Touchstone Television, Jersey Television)–An eccentric, close-knit family billed as a “non-ghoulish, modern-day Addams Family.” Bill Oakley and Josh Weinstein are writers and executive producers; Danny DeVito, Michael Shamberg, Stacey Sher and John Landraf are executive producers; Frank Oz is director.
“The Johnny Chronicles” (Touchstone Television)–Unorthodox private detective (Danny Comden) who comes from a family of by-the-book police officers. Jay Scherick and David Ronn are writers and executive producers; Nena Rodrigue is executive producer; Adam Bernstein is director.
“Legally Blonde” (Touchstone Television, MGM)–Comedy about an unlikely Harvard Law School student, based on the hit movie of the same title. Rachel Sweet is writer and executive producer; Marc Platt is executive producer; Charles Herman-Wurmfeld is director.
“The Mayor of Oyster Bay” (Carsey-Werner-Mandabach)–Comedy centering on an ego-driven dreamer who becomes mayor of a small town. David Israel and Jim O’Doherty are executive producers and writers; Marcy Carsey and Tom Werner are executive producers; John Blanchard is director.
“My Wonderful Life” (Touchstone Television, Granada Entertainment)–A single mother, played by Ally Walker (“Profiler”), tries to balance career and family while searching for romantic satisfaction. Jenji Kohan is writer and executive producer; Suzanne Bukinik and Ann Johnson are executive producers; Andy Cadiff is director.
“Regular Joe” (Touchstone Television)– A “happy empty nester” and his wife find their daughter returning home with a baby in tow. David Litt is writer and executive producer; Nina Wass and Gene Stein are executive producers; Rob Schiller is director.
“Sun Gods” (Touchstone Television)–Workplace comedy about a group of solar panel salesmen. Patrick O’Neill, Steve Pink and D. V. DeVincentis are writers and executive producers; James Widdoes is director.
Untitled Bonnie Hunt project (Touchstone Television)–A family comedy starring Bonnie Hunt (“Return to Me,” “Davis Rules”) and Brian Kerwin (“Beggars & Choosers”). Ms. Hunt is writer, director and executive producer; Don Lake is writer and executive producer.
Untitled couples project (Touchstone Television)–Intertwined relationships of three 30-something couples. Jay Scherick and David Ronn are writers and executive producers; Nena Rodrigue is executive producer; Marc Buckland is director.
Untitled John Ridley project (Touchstone Television)–Husband deals with his social wife and her extensive family. John Ridley is writer and producer; Nina Wass and Gene Stein are executive producers; Ted Wass is director.
Untitled Michael Jacobs project (Touchstone Television, NBC Studios)– A workaholic husband and father makes an attempt to reconnect with his wife and kids. Michael Jacobs is writer and executive producer; Andy Cadiff is director.
Untitled Terri Minsky project (Touchstone Television)–A less than glamorous 25-year-old office temp unexpectedly lands a high-profile secretarial job that puts her at odds with her more glamorous and highly competitive co-workers. Terri Minsky is writer and executive producer; Nina Wass and Gene Stein are executive producers; Ted Wass is director.
“What Leonard Comes Home To” (Touchstone Television, Brad Grey Television)–Single-camera sitcom that explores marriage from the husband’s point of view, starring Griffin Dunne and Elizabeth Perkins. Alan Zweibel is writer and executive producer; Bernie Brillstein, Brad Grey and Jay Kogen are executive producers; Jon Turtletaub is director.
“With You in Spirit” (20th Century Fox Television)–Recent Midwestern college graduate lands on-air reporter position in new-age town of Spirit, N.M. Alan Cohen and Alan Freeland are writers and executive producers; Steve Levitan is writer, director and executive producer.

dramas
“Astronauts” (20th Century Fox Television, Industry Entertainment)–A drama about male and female astronauts competing for a place on a mission to Mars. Todd Robinson is writer and executive producer; Ian Sander, Emile Levisetti, Nick Wechsler and Kim Moses are executive producers; Robert Harmon is director.
“The Calling” (Touchstone Television, Spyglass Entertainment)–A spiritually conflicted man is charged with investigating miracles. Richard Hatem is writer and executive producer; Roger Birnbaum and Gary Barber are executive producers; Matt Reeves is director.
“Capital City” (Touchstone Television, DreamWorks Television)–A young female congressional staffer deals with the political machinations of Washington. Rod Lurie is writer, director and executive producer.
“The Corsairs” (Touchstone Television)–Drama about an affluent media family and its fight to stay in global dominance, starring Patrick Dempsey, John Larroquette, Martin Landau and Robert Sean Leonard. “M*A*S*H” show runner Larry Gelbart is writer and executive producer; Ken Topolsky is executive producer; Michael Dinner is director.
“The Chang Family Saves the World” (Touchstone Television)–Family of Wutan warriors battles evil. Billed as “Spy Kids” meets “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.” John Ridley is writer and executive producer; Kevin Misher is executive producer; Paris Barclay is director.
“Flashpoint” (Touchstone Television)–Foot soldiers for the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Darren Lemke, Chris Brancato and Bert Salke are writers and executive producers; Nena Rodrigue, Nina Wass, Gene Stein and Bob Goodwin are executive producers; Felix Alcala is director.
“Homeward Bound” (Studios USA)–A woman fresh out of law school moves back in with her family and takes a job as a public defender. Jeff Judah and Gabe Sachs are writers and executive producers; Danielle Stokdyk and Jennifer Gwartz are executive producers; Josh Brand is director.
“Nancy Drew” (Touchstone Television)– A two-hour back-door telefilm, based on the former ABC series and Carolyn Keene’s series of mystery novels, featuring Maggie Lawson as the college freshman detective. Ami Mann is writer; Kevin Brown is executive producer; Jim Frawley is director.
“The Oath” (Touchstone Television)–Dedicated doctors battle the HMO system at an urban teaching hospital. Gary Tieche is writer and executive producer; Marc Platt and Abby Wolf-Weiss are executive producers; Michael Hoffman is director.
“Paranormal Girl” (Touchstone Television)–A 16-year-old girl with paranormal abilities is recruited by the government. Pam Brady and Andrew Fleming are writers and executive producers; Mr. Fleming is director.
“Push, Nevada” (Touchstone Television, Live Planet)–Scripted mystery series that gives clues each week to the location of a cash prize to be claimed by a TV viewer. Ben Affleck and Sean Bailey are writers and executive producers; Chris Moore is executive producer; John Naughton is director.
“That Was Then” (Touchstone Television)–A 30-year-old man gets to go back in time to a point in high school where he believes everything started to go wrong in his life. Jeremy Miller and Dan Cohn are writers and executive producers; Jeff Kline is executive producer.
“Veritas” (Touchstone Television)–A two-hour back-door pilot about a father-and-son archeology team. Patrick Massett and John Zinman are writers and executive producers; Bryan Spicer is executive producer and director; Craig Zadan and Neil Meron are executive producers.
CBS
comedies
“Dragans of New York” (CBS Productions)–A husband-and-wife detective team
, a la ABC’s “Hart to Hart” and film’s “The Thin Man.” Hugh Laurie and Alex Taub are writers and executive producers; Jim Hayman is director.
“Julie Lydecker” (Paramount Network Television)–Single woman (played by Mary McCormack) loses her job and reinvents herself but still struggles with her quirky mother (Mia Farrow). Jennifer Crittenden is writer and executive producer; Phil Rosenthal is executive producer; Jerry Zaks is director.
“Life of the Party” (20th Century Fox TV, CBS Productions)–Nathan Lane stars as a former TV star turned freshman U.S. congressman. Jeffrey Richman is writer and executive producer; Jerry Zaks is director.
Untitled Marsh McCall/Nia Vardalos project (Brad Grey Television)–Starring Nia Vardalos as a Greek American woman who must deal with her large, off-kilter family. Based on the motion picture “My Big Fat Greek Wedding.” Marsh McCall is writer and executive producer; Ms. Vardalos is writer and co-executive producer; Rita Wilson and Brad Grey are executive producers; Pamela Fryman is director.
“Still Standing” (20th Century Fox Television, CBS Productions)–A blue-collar family finds itself the only traditional family on the block. Diane Burroughs and Joey Gutierrez are writers and executive producers; Andrew Weyman is director.
“Two Families” (Warner Bros. Television)–A pair of widowers (Brian Dennehy and Laurie Metcalf) begin a romance that is occasionally hindered by the needs of their dysfunctional children. Chuck Lorre is writer and executive producer; Pamela Fryman is director.
Untitled Keenan and Lloyd Project (Paramount Network Television)–Aspiring female writer reconnects with her estranged father, a renowned novelist. Christopher Lloyd and Joe Keenan are writers and executive producers; James Burrows is director.
dramas
“CSI: Miami” (Alliance Atlantis, CBS Productions)–This spinoff of “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation,” which is set in Las Vegas, moves to Miami’s South Beach, where star David Caruso leads a forensics team. Ann Donahue, Carol Mendelsohn and Anthony Zulker are writers and executive producers; Jerry Bruckheimer is executive producer; Danny Cannon is director.
“Georgetown” (Big Ticket TV)–Helen Mirren stars in this behind-the-scenes look at the corridors of power in Washington. Joseph Doherty is writer and executive producer; Al Ruddy, and Gerry Rafshoon are executive producers; Scott Winant is director and executive producer.
“Hack” (Big Ticket Television, Pariah, CBS Productions)–A former cop (David Morse) drives a taxi and helps the “little guy” by solving crimes. David Koepp is writer and executive producer; Gavin Polone is executive producer; Thomas Carter is director and executive producer.
“Jo” (Spelling Television, CBS Productions)–Andie McDowell stars as a veterinarian in Asheville, N.C. Mike Newell is director and executive producer; Toni Graphia is writer and executive producer; Denise DiNovi and Cam Jones are executive producers.
“Lefty” (Big Ticket Television, Brad Grey Television)–A nonconformist priest in a low-income urban neighborhood helps those in need. Cynthia Cidre is writer and executive producer. Sylvester Stallone and Brad Grey are executive producers; Kevin Sullivan is director.
“Presidio Med” (Warner Bros. Television, John Wells Productions)–Dana Delany and Blythe Danner star in a San Francisco-based medical drama. Lydia Woodward and John Wells are writers and executive producers; Christopher Chulack is director and executive producer.
“Queens Supreme” (CBS Productions)– Seriocomic drama about a Supreme Court justice in Queens, N. Y., starring Oliver Platt, Robert Loggia and Annabella Sciorra. Kevin Fox is writer and executive producer; Elaine Goldsmith-Thomas, Deborah Schindler and Julia Roberts are executive producers; Tim Robbins is director.
“R.U.S/H.” (Studios USA, Heel and Toe Films)–William Baldwin, Colm Meany and Mary Stuart Masterson star as members of an elite Los Angeles Police Department unit. Paul Attanasio is writer and executive producer; Katie Jacobs is executive producer; Gary Fleder is director.
Untitled Allison Anders project (DreamWorks Television; Greenblatt-Janollari Studio)–Marcia Gay Harden stars as a parole officer who adopts a young Latino boy. Allison Anders is writer, director and executive producer; Kurt Voss is writer and executive producer; Robert Greenblatt and David Janollari are executive producers.
Untitled Michael Mann project (Studios USA)–Tom Sizemore stars as head of the Los Angeles Police Department’s robbery/homicide unit. Barry Schindel is writer and executive producer; Michael Mann is executive producer; Sandy Climan and Gary Strangis are producers; Stephen Gyllenhaal is director.
“Without a Trace” (Warner Bros. Television, Jerry Bruckheimer Productions, CBS Productions)–Anthony LaPaglia leads the FBI’s missing persons division. Hank Steinberg is writer and co-executive producer; Jerry Bruckheimer and Jonathan Littman are executive producers; David Nutter is director.
Fox
comedies
“Beat Cops” (NBC Studios, Conaco)–Pair of New York City police officers working the beat. Conan O’Brien, Jeff Ross, Don Woodard, Tom Maxwell and Sam Seder are executive producers.
“Boarding School” (Twentieth Television, Imagine Television)–Comedy set at all-female boarding school in Vermont (also under the working title “BS”). Jeffrey Klarik is writer and executive producer; Tony Krantz, Brian Grazer and Ron Howard are executive producers; Gary Halvorson is director.
“The Cedric Show” (20th Century Fox TV)–Cedric the Entertainer in a hybrid sketch and situation comedy. John Bowman and Matt Wickline are writers and executive producers; Stan Lathan is director and executive producer.
“The Grubbs” (Studios USA)–Centers around a blue-collar family with a long history of failure and a teenage son named Clark who falls in love with his beautiful new teacher. Josh Sternin and Jeff Ventimilia are writers and executive producers; Andrew Weyman is director.
“Life on Parole” (20th Century Fox Television, DreamWorks Television)–Disgruntled parole officer and best-friend parolee. Judd Apatow and Brent Forrester are writers and executive producers; Jon Favreau is director.
“Next!” (20th Century Fox TV)–Sketch comedy in the spirit of Bob Odenkirk’s HBO series “Mr. Show”; a pair of half-hours were shot last December. Mr. Odenkirk is writer and executive producer; Bernie Brillstein is executive producer; Keith Truesdell is director.
“Oliver Beene” (20th Century Fox Television, DreamWorks Television)–A grown man looks back “nostalgically” to his childhood in the 1950s during the Communism-inspired bomb scares, a la “Wonder Years.” Howard Gewirtz is writer and executive producer; Steve Levitan is executive producer; Jeff Melman is director.
“The Pitts” (20th Century Fox TV)–Misadventures of the “unluckiest” family in the world. Mike Scully and Julie Thacker are the writers and executive producers; Lee Shallat Chemel is director.
Untitled Eric Gilliland project (Studios USA)–Liberal son locks horns with his new conservative stepdad. Eric Gilliland is writer and executive producer; Jay Sandrich is director.
Untitled Ricky Blitt project (20th Century Fox Television)–Hyper-neurotic slacker attempts to change his life after his childhood sweetheart returns home. Ricky Blitt is writer and executive producer; Bryan Gordon is director.
“Wanda at Large” (Warner Bros. Television)–Wanda Sykes stars as a correspondent for a Washington morning TV show. Bruce Helford, Les Firestein and Deborah Oppenheimer are writers and executive producers; Ms. Sykes is writer-producer; Lance Crouther is writer; Gerry Cohen is director.
dramas
“Eastwick” (Warner Bros. Television)–Centers on the 15-year-old sons from the original “The Witches of Eastwick” motion picture and John Updike novel. Jon Cowan and Robert Rovner are writers and supervising producers; Jim Leonard is executive producer.
“Fastlane” (Warner Bros. Television)–A multiethnic drama about two undercover police officers. Jo
hn McNamara is writer and executive producer; Joseph McGinty Mitchell (a k a McG) is executive producer and director; and Danny Rappaport is executive producer; Stephanie Savage is producer.
“Firefly” (20th Century Fox Television, Mutant Enemy)–A two-hour back-door pilot, billed as a sci-fi Western, from “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and “Angel” creator Joss Whedon. Mr. Whedon is writer, director and executive producer.
“Girls Club” (20th Century Fox Television, David E. Kelly Productions)–Three young female attorneys live in a loft in San Francisco. David E. Kelley is writer and executive producer; Todd Holland is director.
“John Doe” (Regency Television)–Amnesiac mysteriously washes ashore and realizes he’s become a genius–except in knowing his own identity. Brandon Camp and Mike Thompson are writers and executive producers; Mimi Leder is director and executive producer.
“Keen Eddie” (Paramount Network Television, The Littlefield Company)–American cop goes to London (shot on location) to solve an international mystery that destroyed his career, Joel Wyman is writer and executive producer; Simon West is director and executive producer; Warren Littlefield is executive producer.
“Save the Last Dance” (Paramount Network Television, Cort/Madden Productions)–Based on the feature film about a girl from a Midwestern suburb who dreams of becoming a ballerina. Toni-Ann Johnson is writer; Bob Cort, David Madden and Dan Pyne are executive producers.
“Septuplets” (20th Century Fox Television)–Dramedy explores the dynamics of 16-year-old septuplets living in their family’s hotel. Kip Koenig is writer and executive producer; Dawn Parouse is executive producer; Michael Spiller is director.
“Time Tunnel” (20th Century Fox Television, Regency Television)–Based on original Irwin Allen-created series, a male and a female operative travel through time to prevent disasters and right wrongs in history. Rand Ravich is writer and executive producer; Todd Holland is director and executive producer; Jon Jashni, Kevin Burns and Andrew Lazar are executive producers; Sheila Allen is producer.
Untitled Secret Service project (20th Century Fox Television)–Ensemble drama revolving around Washington-based Secret Service agents. Jeff Rake is writer and executive producer.
NBC
comedies
“A.U.S.A.” (20th Century Fox Television, NBC Studios)–Single-camera comedy about a group of young lawyers in the U.S. Attorneys office. Richard Appel is writer and executive producer; Michael Lehmann is director.
“Class of ’06” (NBC Studios, Paramount Network Television)–Hijinks and tribulations of six incoming college freshmen. Adam Chase is writer and executive producer; Ted Wass is director.
“Good Morning, Miami” (Warner Bros. Television)–An ambitious television executive becomes the executive producer of the lowest-rated morning program in Miami; NBC has made a 13-episode commitment with the producing team from “Will & Grace.” David Kohan and Max Mutchnick are writers and executive producers; James Burrows is director.
“Hidden Hills” (NBC Studios, Primarily Entertainment)–A family show about a married couple and their three kids living in the ‘burbs. Ric Swartzlander and Peter Segal are writers and executive producers. Susanne Daniels and Kate Juergens are executive producers; Bob Berlinger is director.
“In-Laws” (Paramount Network Television, NBC Studios, Grammnet)–Ensemble comedy about a son-in-law (Elon Gold) who moves in with his gruff father-in-law (Dennis Farina). Mark Reisman is writer and executive producer; Kelsey Grammer is executive producer; Pamela Fryman is director.
“It’s Not About Me” (NBC Studios)–A man leaves his high-pressure job to become a teacher. Jonathan Groff is writer and executive producer; Vic Kaplan is executive producer; Marc Buckland is director.
“Life at Five Feet” (NBC Enterprises, Pariah Productions)–Alex Borstein (formerly of Fox’s “Mad TV”) stars as an everyday woman who gets a job ghostwriting a magazine column for a supermodel. Maya Forbes is writer and executive producer; Gavin Polone is executive producer; Gail Mancuso is director.
“Romeo Fire” (Warner Bros. Television, NBC Studios)–Focuses on a group of firefighters in a small town that has not had a fire for years; NBC has made a 13-episode commitment. Greg Malins is writer and executive producer; Kevin Bright is director.
Untitled Chevy Chase project (NBC Studios, SNL Studios)–Mr. Chase stars as a TV magazine host and the father of three young daughters in an update of “My Three Sons.” Richard Dresser and Tom Leopold are writers and executive producers. Lorne Michaels is executive producer; John Paquin is director.
Untitled Ken Finkleman project (20th Century Fox Television, NBC Studios, Imagine Television)–Harried news director’s life at work and at home. Ken Finkleman is writer, director and executive producer; Tony Krantz, Ron Howard and Brian Grazer are executive producers.
Untitled Greg Giraldo project (NBC Studios, Conaco)–Greg Giraldo stars as a single dad who has a male caretaker watch his 2-year-old daughter while he’s doing his schtick on the comedy club circuit at night. Tim Doyle is writer and executive producer. Conan O’Brien and Vic Kaplan are executive producers; Gil Junger is director.
dramas
“Boomtown” (DreamWorks Television, NBC Studios)–Story of the city of Los Angeles as seen through the eyes of cops, paramedics, beat reporters and city officials. Graham Yost is writer and executive producer; Jon Avnet is director.
“Kingpin” (Aaron Spelling Productions, NBC Studios)–In the vein of the feature film “Traffic,” centering on the illicit drug trade. David Mills is writer and executive producer; Aaron Spelling and E. Duke Vincent are executive producers; Allen Coulter is director.
Untitled Clark/Prince/American Bandstand project, a k a “Miss American Pie” (Studios USA, NBC Studios)–A 1960s-era drama set against the backdrop of the classic musical series “American Bandstand.” Jonathan Prince is writer and executive producer; Ellie Herman is writer; Dick Clark is executive producer; David Semel is director.
“Miss Miami” (Touchstone Television, NBC Studios)–Drama focusing on a Latina FBI agent in Miami, starring Roselyn Sanchez and Jonathan Silverman. Michael Duggan is writer and executive producer.
“Mister Sterling” (Studios USA, NBC Studios)–A young, independent U.S. senator (Josh Brolin) brings idealism and his own agenda to Washington. Lawrence O’Donnell Jr. is writer and executive producer; Tucker Gates is director.
“St. George” (NBC Studios)–Mel Harris and Ed Quinn star as veterinarians who move their family to South Africa to run a game preserve. Tommy Lynch is writer and executive producer; Eric Laneuville is director.
“War Stories” (Industry Entertainment, NBC Studios)–Jeff Goldblum and Lake Bell star in drama dealing with the exploits of on-the-scene war correspondents. Peter Noah is writer and executive producer; Keith Addis is executive producer; Bob Singer is director.
“Young Arthur” (NBC Studios)–In the vein of the feature film “A Knight’s Tale,” a young King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table fight evil. Remi Aubuchon and Graham Yost are the writers and executive producers; Mikael Salomon is director.
“Zero Effect” (Warner Bros. Television, Castle Rock Entertainment)–Based on the feature film of the same name, about an eccentric private detective solving unusual cases. Jake Kasdan is writer, director and executive producer; Walon Green is writer and executive producer.
WB
comedies
“Do Over” (Paramount Network Television, The Littlefield Co.)–A 34-year-old man gets the chance to return to the 1980s and relive high school as a 14-year-old. Rick Weiner and Kenny Schwartz are writers; Warren Littlefield is executive producer; Lev Spiro is director.
“Family Affair” (Turner Television, Pariah)–Remake of the popular 1960s sitcom. Bob Young is writer; Gavin Polone, Sid and Marty Kroft and Randy Pope are executive producers; Barnet Kellman is director.
“Generat
ion Gap” (Viacom Productions)–She’s old, wild and crazy–and she’s moving back in with her stick-in-the-mud daughter and grandkids. Kayla Alpert is writer and executive producer; Tim O’Donnell is executive producer; Wil Shriner is director.
“House Blend” (Paramount Network Television)–Two divorced single parents raise kids under one roof. Ann Flett-Giordano and Chuck Ranberg are writers and executive producers; John Whitesell is director.
“In My Opinion” (Turner Television, Primarily Entertainment)–Comedy revolves around a female advice columnist for a Chicago newspaper. Lona Williams is writer and executive producer. Susanne Daniels and Kate Juergens are executive producers; James Widdoes is director.
“Just Like You” (Turner Television)–A Latino family as imagined by writer/creator Peter Murietta. Rob LaZebnik, Howard Klein and David Miner are executive producers; James Widdoes is director.
“The O’Keefes” (Turner Television)–Eccentric parents find their home-schooled children end up feeling out of place and unhip when they enter a public school. Mark O’Keefe and Becky Hartman-Edwards are executive producers; Andy Ackerman is director.
“On the Spot” (Warner Bros. Television)–Ensemble comedy set in hotel, incorporating improv and sketch bits that also allow the studio audience to dictate story lines. Rob Cohen is writer and executive producer; Dan Patterson is consulting producer; Gerry Cohen is director.
“Prep” (Turner Television)–Crazy antics within a co-ed boarding school. Tommy Lynch, Chad Fiveash and James Stoteraux are executive producers; Rodman Flender is director.
“St. Sass” (Warner Bros. Television, Tollin/Robbins Productions)–Delta Burke stars as headmistress of a girls’ prep school. Ryan Murphy and Diana Wilk are writers and executive producers; Mike Tollin, Brian Robbins and Joe Davola are executive producers.
What I Like About You (Warner Bros. Television, Tollin/Robbins Productions)–15-year-old Nickelodeon star Amanda Bynes is featured as a teenage girl who moves in with her older, independent sister (Jennie Garth). Dan Schneider, Wil Calhoun, Mike Tollin, Brian Robbins and Joe Davola are executive producers; Gary Halvorson is director.
“Way Downtown” (Turner Television, Brad Grey Television)–Female buddy comedy starring Tori Spelling, set in the Big Apple. Amy Engelberg and Wendy Engelberg are writers and executive producers; Brad Grey and Peter Traugott are executive producers; John Whitsell is director.
dramas
“Aces” (Warner Bros. Television, Regency Television)–A light-hearted family drama centering on the son of a power-playing rounder who attends an elite private school. Leonard Dick is writer and executive producer; Greer Shephard and Michael Robin are executive producers.
“Birds of Prey” (Warner Bros. Television, Tollin/Robbins Productions)–Based on a DC Comics offshoot of the Batman franchise in which three young women battle villains in Gotham City. Laeta Kalogridis is writer and co-executive producer; Mike Tollin and Joe Davola are executive producers; Brian Robbins is director and executive producer.
“The Black Sash” (Warner Bros. Television, Tollin/Robbins Productions)–Russell Wong stars as a former cop who becomes a martial arts expert determined to exact justice. Robert Kamen is writer and executive producer; Dylan Sellers, Mike Tollin, Brian Robbins and Joe Davola are executive producers; D.J. Caruso is director.
“Everwood” (Warner Bros. Television)–A famous neurosurgeon moves his teenage kids from New York City to a rural Colorado town after his wife dies; candidate for script development funding from the advertiser-led Family Friendly Programming Forum. Greg Berlanti is writer and executive producer; Mickey Liddell is co-executive producer; Mark Piznarski is director.
“Home of the Brave” (Aaron Spelling Television)–Trials and tribulations of a military family. Winifred Hervey is writer and executive producer; Aaron Spelling and E. Duke Vincent are executive producers; Steve Miner is director.
“In My Life” (Turner Television, American Zoetrope)–Set against the backdrop the Civil Rights Movement in 1964 as a group of teen-age boys come of age in Baton Rouge, La. Ira Ungerleider is writer and executive producer; Maira Suro and Francis Ford Coppola are executive producers; Lesli Linka Glatter is director.
“The Lone Ranger” (Turner Television, Primarily Entertainment)–New take on the classic tale of the Lone Ranger, who with his sidekick Tonto avenge the deaths of fellow Texas Rangers. Stacy Title and Jonathan Penner are writers and executive producers; Susanne Daniels, Kate Juergens and Eric Ellenbogen are executive producers; Jack Bender is director.
“Lost in Oz” (Warner Bros. Television, A Band Apart Productions)–New take on L. Frank Baum’s classic “Wizard of Oz,” in which a 20-something woman (played by Melissa George) leads a revolt against the powers in Oz. David Hayter is writer and executive producer; Lawrence Bender, Kevin Brown and Joel Smith are executive producers; Mick Garris is director.
UPN
comedies
“Abby Newton” (CBS Productions)–African American woman juggles life with her ex-boyfriend and work on a sports show. Nat Bernstein and Mitchel Katlin are writers and executive producers.
dramas
“Empire” (Regency Television)–Pair of African American brothers start a hip-hop record label. Based on a story from Sofia Coppola. John Ridley is writer; Ms. Coppola, Francis Ford Coppola, Maira Suro, Robert Greenblatt and David Janollari are executive producers; Kevin Bray is director.
“Haunted” (Industry Entertainment, Viacom Productions, CBS Productions)–Man comes back after being dead for five minutes to find that he’s haunted by ghosts who help him solve crimes. Rick Ramage is writer and executive producer; Andre Cosby is writer and supervising producer; Keith Addis and Emile Levisetti are executive producers; Michael Rymer is director.
“The Legacy” (Jerry Bruckheimer Television Productions, Warner Bros. Television)–Young assistant D.A. inherits super powers and must learn how to cope with his job, girlfriend and new life. Simon Kinberg is writer and co-executive producer; Jerry Bruckheimer and Jonathan Littman are executive producers; Jim Gillespie is director.
“One for the Money” (Wendy Finerman Productions, Columbia TriStar Domestic Television)–Rookie female bounty hunter. Phoef Sutton and Mark Legan are writers and executive producers; Wendy Finerman is executive producer.
“The Twilight Zone” (Trilogy Entertainment, New Line Television)–Forest Whitaker takes over as the host of the revived sci-fi anthology series. Pam Densham is writer and executive producer; Mark Stern and John Watson are executive producers; Jonathan Frakes is director.
Sources: TV networks, studios and talent agency executives