In Depth

WGA Strike Roundup: Friday, Feb. 15

CBS Will Follow Through With Upfronts in May
CBS said two days after the Writers Guild of America strike ended that it would go through with plans for its upfront party and will present its shows to potential advertisers at New York’s Carnegie Hall on May 14, Daily Variety reports. The CW will hold its upfronts the following day at Madison Square Garden while ABC and NBC are likely to tone down their upfronts presentations, the newspaper says.

WGA West Head Calls SAG Boycott of Globes Awards a ‘Turning Point’

Writers Guild of America West President Patric Verrone said the Screen Actors Guild members’ willingness to join the WGA on picket lines and boycott the Golden Globes Awards “was undoubtedly a turning point” in the 100-day strike, Web site DeadlineHollywoodDaily reports. Verrone, who thanked the SAG in a statement yesterday, said about 80 SAG members in Los Angeles and New York picketed for each of the 100 days of the strike, the Web site says.

Vilanch Among Writers Rejoining Oscar Effort
Comedy writer and regular Oscar contributor Bruce Vilanch led a group of writers that joined Academy Awards producers Wednesday, the day after the Writers Guild of America’s 100-day strike ended, to help prepare for the Feb. 24 Oscars, the New York Times reports. Host Jon Stewart is expected to arrive in Los Angeles Sunday while award presenters will include Amy Adams, Tom Hanks and Nicole Kidman, the newspaper says.

Winship Calls Walkout ‘A Perfect Strike,’ Touts Residual Gains
Writers Guild of America East President Michael Winship called the recently ended 100-day WGA work stoppage “a perfect strike” and touted the union’s gains in residual payments on revenue from Internet distribution, the New York Times reports. The WGA’s new contract provisions mark a substantial improvement over a previous arrangement in which writers received a 5-cent flat fee for each DVD of their work sold, the newspaper says.

SAG Executive Director Doesn’t Commit to Date to Start Talks
Screen Actors Guild National Executive Director Doug Allen didn’t commit to a start date for negotiations with studios, Daily Variety reports. The Alliance of Motion Picture & Television Producers said it was ready to start discussions, while stars including Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep this week ran a Daily Variety ad saying immediate talks were necessary given the recently ended 100-day Writers Guild of America strike, the newspaper says. Allen said yesterday that talks will begin “at the time that most benefits our members,” Daily Variety says.

—Danny King